All posts by Dustin

Dustin is a lifelong angler who channels his passion for the sport into all aspects of his life. By trade, Dustin is the president/owner of Fishwest, Inc. Otherwise, he can often be found lost in thoughts of his next saltwater destination or the next time he can stand in steelhead waters casting a two-hander.

Loop-to-Loop Splice Knot

This knot is used for splicing a spey line for loop to loop tips or customizing the rear of a scandi head or front of a skagit amongst other uses.  It is also used a lot on shooting heads of all kinds.

  1. The loop is made out of 50 lb braided mono.
  2. Splice it back into itself and then braided handcuff over the end of the fly line, sink tip, etc.
  3. Then do 2-3 nail knots with 10-12 lb maxima or floro.
  4. Then trim flush the braided mono ends.
  5. A thin bit of glue to cover the knots and the spot where the fly line terminates within the loop.   Note: You do not want to glue over the rest as it needs to have the handcuff effect.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Scoot realizes the results - knows he should have done it sooner.

More Non-Fishing Uses For Fly Tying Materials

With the craze of all the ladies putting feathers in their hair (see our recent post about this), we started thinking about all the materials we have in our fly tying department.  Our findings…the fly tying selection also doubles as a fashion gold mine!  As we stood looking at all the possibilities, we were overwhelmed with all good that we could do in the world, fashion and otherwise.  We thought we could take great fly tying materials and use them to improve a few unfortunate soul’s quality of life.  Here is a sampling of our experiments and case studies.

Case Study #1

Hillary, being a girl and all, has always had a bad case of mustache envy. She considered taking some heavy doses of hormones, but that could lead to some pretty bad side-effects.  A risk that she wasn’t willing to take.  Not to worry…we chose a nice  juicy patch of arctic fox hair and with the help of a little swax (fly tying wax), we were able to shape this beauty. The best part is how well the color matches her hair, it could easily be mistaken for her own.  A mustache this epic hides her smile, but you can see the happiness in her eyes.  Now she has to learn how to eat without leaving bits of food for later…

Case Study #2

Jason was tragically born without eyebrows.  We know, we know…tragedy doesn’t even begin to describe the pain.  We thought about drawing some on for him- a la Uncle Leo…”Woah, woah, no need to get angry.  I don’t care for your demeanor.”- but we knew we could do better.  He is shown here wearing our newly designed rabbit-strip eyebrows.  Now Jason, go out into the world, be proud and show it what you are made of!

Case Study #3

Lara has always been unable to get her ears pierced, due to a strange fear of straight sharp needles. Well Lara, you are in luck! From a distance, we can make a perfect cast and “pierce” your ear before you even know what happened.  “Most” of the time, we are dead-on with our cast and Lara was the lucky one.  Even better, we didn’t use a straight needle…our tool of choice was a size two intruder hook.   The question is, can we complete the impossible and take care of the other ear without any trips to the emergency room.  Enjoy your new intruder-style bling!

Case Study # 4

This may very well be our proudest accomplishment.  Scoot has always had trouble with his confidence, which translated into trouble with the ladies.  We couldn’t figure out what the problem was and after a few mistrials, we were pretty frustrated.  Like everything we do, we never, ever gave up.  Then…BAM…we got it!  Let us introduce you to the new and improved Scoot sporting our very stylish bucktail chest hair implants.  So natural, so long, so sexy…this did the trick and the proof is in the pudding.  He is now the talk of the town and life couldn’t be better.  Go get ‘em Scoot!

Just a few of the great things that can be done, right out of the fly shop. When you are ready to move up in the world, come see us.

 

Tying The Homer Rhode Loop Knot

This is another great and very strong loop knot.  The non-slipping loop allows your fly to move freely and adds just a little more action than a traditional clinch type knot.  This knot is extremely useful on heavy shock tippet.

  1. Tie an overhand knot in the line.
  2. Thread the tag through the eye of the fly and then back through the original overhand knot.
  3. Tie a second overhand knot in the tag end around the main line above the original overhand knot.
  4. Pull everything into place, working the knot into position depending on how big you want the final loop to be.  Use saliva to lubricate the knot as it is tightened.
  5. Once the knot is tight and secure, trim the tag end.

 

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying the Triple Surgeons Loop Knot

Are you looking for an alternative to the Bimini Twist?  The Triple Surgeon’s Loop works well.  It is a quick easy knot to do in the field and get you back to fishing fast.

  1. Start by doubling the line over and creating a loop.
  2. Take the loop and add an overhand knot approximately where you want the base of the final knot loop.
  3. Proceed to do a total of three (hence the triple in the name) wraps of the loop through the overhand knot.
  4. Pull everything into place, working the knot into position depending on how big you want the final loop to be.  Use saliva to lubricate the knot as it is tightened.
  5. Once the knot is tight and secure, trim the tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

I Totally Want To Throw Her For Muskie

The fly-tying-materials-in-your-hair-craze came front and center here today.  These very nice girls came by looking for hackles, flashabou and fur to integrate into their hair.  Much like a Tiger Muskie, they seemed to be attracted to the brighter, flashier colors.

We called all of our fly tying supplies and got promptly laughed at when we told them we were looking for long saddle hackles.

We advised the ladies to be careful if they went near any saltwater flats or the lakes with long fish.

When we said we wanted more women to get into fly fishing…this is not necessarily what we meant.

Let us know what you think…

Tying the No-Slip Mono Loop Knot

The No-Slip Mono Loop Knot is used for tying on bigger flies so they have a little more action.  A clinch-type knot grabs onto the eye and constrains movement.  Sometimes a little more wiggle in your fly can make all the difference.

  1. Start by tying and overhand knot in your line (before you thread it through the eye of the hook).
  2. Take the tag end of the line through the eye
  3. Thread the tag end back through the loop in the line created by the overhand knot.
  4. Wrap the tag end around the main line 5-7 times.
  5. Thread the tag end through the overhand knot.
  6. Slowly pull the knot tight, while maintaining the loop size desired.  Use lubrication if necessary.
  7. Once it is tight, clip your tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying the Perfection Loop Knot

This knot is perfect for tying a loop in the thick end of a new leader or in the end of a piece of butt-section.

  1. Create a loop in the line with the tag end going behind the main line.  The tag should be out to the right of the loop.
  2. Bring the tag end of the line back around the loop you have created.  The tag should now be in front of the loop out the left side.
  3. Again, take the tag end around the back of the knot, creating another loop the left of the original loop.  The tag is now to the right hand side of the loop.
  4. Lay the tag end between the two loops, then take the left (or second loop) through the top loop (first loop).
  5. Slowly tighten the knot, keeping it relatively small.  Lubricate the knot as needed.
  6. Once the knot is tight, trim the tag end.

 

A special thanks to Greg Pearson for his great illustrations!