Category Archives: Fly Fishing Knots

Tying The Triple Surgeon Knot

This knot is useful for connecting two pieces of tippet, leader or other line materials together.  It is pretty fast and easily done stream side.  The line will also come out of this knot pretty straight in both directions.

  1. Lay the two butt ends of the lines next to each other, but in opposing directions.
  2. Create a loop using both tag ends.
  3. Wrap the tag ends through the loop three times (that is where the “triple” comes from).
  4. Pull all four legs of the knot to tighten.  Lubricate with water or saliva as necessary.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

 

Tying The Albright Knot

The Albright Knot is a very strong connection from your fly line to your leader or butt section.  It can also be used to attach a fly line to backing.  The strength of this knot comes from the core of the fly line being doubled over and incorporated in the knot.  Some knots rely simply on tightening into the coating of the line which, under high pressure, can slip off.

  1. Start by doubling the fly line over and threading your butt section material though the loop that was created.
  2. Wrap the tag end back around both legs of the loop and the butt section material several times.
  3. Thread the tag end back through the loop the same direction it came through initially.
  4. As the knot is tightened, work the wraps as close to the top of the loop as possible (without the butt section material slipping off the fly line loop).  Pull everything tight and trim the end of the fly line that is exposed from the knot.
  5. In theory, that is the end of the Albright Knot, but it tends to have a pretty abrupt edge that doesn’t feed through the eyes of the fly rod very well.  To remedy this we can tie a quick jam-knot using the tag end of the butt section material.  Wrap the tag around the main line four times.
  6. Now, wrap the loop around the main line as well.
  7. Slowly pull the tag end to tighten everything down.  Use saliva or water to moisten the knot as it is secured.
  8. Trim the final tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying The Homer Rhode Double Overhand Loop Knot

The Homer Rhode Double Overhand Loop Knot is a great variation on the basic Homer Rhode Loop Knot.  This knot adds one more tightening point in the knot to keep it from slipping out.  A good solid loop knot is invaluable when fishing streamers and saltwater flies and you need them to have the best action possible.  A traditional clinch-type knot will restrict fly movement, where a loop will allow it to perform at its best.

  1. Before threading the line through the eye of the hook, tie a double overhand knot and slowly tighten it (but not all the way).  Often times the know will flip into a figure-eight on its own.  If it doesn’t, you may need to encourage it to do so.
  2. Now take the line through the eye of the hook and back through the figure-eight as shown.
  3. Slowly tighten the figure-eight now and slide it down so that it is up against the eye of the hook.
  4. Tie a single overhand around the main line with the tag end.  Snug it fairly tight.
  5. Simply hold the fly and pull the main line and the two knots will slide together and tighten, while leaving a nice loop between the knot and the fly.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying the Improved Blood Knot

The Improved Blood Knot is great for connecting a smaller line to a larger line (like lighter class tippet to heavy shock or bite material).

  1. Double your lighter tippet over to create a loop and lay the two tag ends side-by-side, facing the opposite direction.
  2. Wrap the loop around the other line several times and then bring it back through the “V” created.  It is important to remember whether you went down into the “V” or up from underneath.  Either is fine, you just need to do the opposite with the other tag end.
  3. Take the other tag end and wrap it around the other line several times then through the hole (that used to be the “V”).  Again make sure you take it through the opposite direction from the original tag end.
  4. Lubricate the knot and pull everything tight simultaneously.
  5. Trim the tag ends.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

Tying the Blood Knot

The Blood Knot is a standard in all type of fishing from freshwater to saltwater.  Use it to join two strands of line together that are of similar diameter.  The Blood Knot creates a really nice, low profile that goes through your guides easily.

  1. Lay the two tag ends side-by-side, facing the opposite direction.
  2. Wrap one of the tag ends around the other line several times and then bring it back through the “V” created.  It is important to remember whether you went down into the “V” or up from underneath.  Either is fine, we just need to do the opposite with the other tag end.
  3. Take the other tag end and wrap it around the other line several times then through the hole (that used to be the “V”).  Again make sure you take it through the opposite direction from the original tag end.
  4. Lubricate the knot and pull everything tight.
  5. Trim the tag ends.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Bimini Twist Loop Knot

The Bimini Twist is one of the most important knots most fly fisherman should know, but it is also one of the most intimidating.  Well, it shouldn’t be.  With a little practice almost anyone can become quite proficient at it.  The Bimini Twist is great for creating loops in mono or backing while maintaining the materials full breaking strength.

  1. Begin by creating a loop and twist it using your hand to rotate inside the loop.  You should create 20-25 twists in the line.
  2. Attach the loop to something secure (ie-a cleat in the boat, your knee, your toe, a post of some kind), just be sure you don’t damage the line in the process. Our anchor is notated by “A” in our diagram.
  3. This is the tricky part…use your finger or a pen (“B” in the diagram) to pull the wraps (making the loop slightly larger).  The tension from the tightening of the wraps will allow the tag end to spin or wrap back down over the original wraps.  Cover the entire length of the original wraps with the new.
  4. Tie a half hitch around one of the legs.
  5. Tie a half hitch around the other leg.
  6. Tie a jam knot around both legs of the loop.
  7. Gently tighten the jam knot down towards the wraps.
  8. Trim the tag end.
  9. Secure the knot with super glue, Loon UV Knot Sense or Clear Cure Goo Flexible.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

Loop-to-Loop Splice Knot

This knot is used for splicing a spey line for loop to loop tips or customizing the rear of a scandi head or front of a skagit amongst other uses.  It is also used a lot on shooting heads of all kinds.

  1. The loop is made out of 50 lb braided mono.
  2. Splice it back into itself and then braided handcuff over the end of the fly line, sink tip, etc.
  3. Then do 2-3 nail knots with 10-12 lb maxima or floro.
  4. Then trim flush the braided mono ends.
  5. A thin bit of glue to cover the knots and the spot where the fly line terminates within the loop.   Note: You do not want to glue over the rest as it needs to have the handcuff effect.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying The Homer Rhode Loop Knot

This is another great and very strong loop knot.  The non-slipping loop allows your fly to move freely and adds just a little more action than a traditional clinch type knot.  This knot is extremely useful on heavy shock tippet.

  1. Tie an overhand knot in the line.
  2. Thread the tag through the eye of the fly and then back through the original overhand knot.
  3. Tie a second overhand knot in the tag end around the main line above the original overhand knot.
  4. Pull everything into place, working the knot into position depending on how big you want the final loop to be.  Use saliva to lubricate the knot as it is tightened.
  5. Once the knot is tight and secure, trim the tag end.

 

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying the Triple Surgeons Loop Knot

Are you looking for an alternative to the Bimini Twist?  The Triple Surgeon’s Loop works well.  It is a quick easy knot to do in the field and get you back to fishing fast.

  1. Start by doubling the line over and creating a loop.
  2. Take the loop and add an overhand knot approximately where you want the base of the final knot loop.
  3. Proceed to do a total of three (hence the triple in the name) wraps of the loop through the overhand knot.
  4. Pull everything into place, working the knot into position depending on how big you want the final loop to be.  Use saliva to lubricate the knot as it is tightened.
  5. Once the knot is tight and secure, trim the tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

Tying the No-Slip Mono Loop Knot

The No-Slip Mono Loop Knot is used for tying on bigger flies so they have a little more action.  A clinch-type knot grabs onto the eye and constrains movement.  Sometimes a little more wiggle in your fly can make all the difference.

  1. Start by tying and overhand knot in your line (before you thread it through the eye of the hook).
  2. Take the tag end of the line through the eye
  3. Thread the tag end back through the loop in the line created by the overhand knot.
  4. Wrap the tag end around the main line 5-7 times.
  5. Thread the tag end through the overhand knot.
  6. Slowly pull the knot tight, while maintaining the loop size desired.  Use lubrication if necessary.
  7. Once it is tight, clip your tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson