Category Archives: How-To

Summertime and the Streamers are Easy…

Typically no one thinks of fishing streamers in the middle of summer. Especially not when fish are looking up for terrestrials, caddis or large stoneflies. In all honesty several of my best streamers days have been had in June through September, not late fall like typically thought. Last year one of my nicest and most memorable fish came after a stellar morning of fishing large attractor dries while floating the South Fork of the Snake . The morning started out great and the fish were eating hoppers and attractor dries very well, until the gale force winds kicked up in the afternoon. After 45 minutes of struggling to deliver a bushy dry inches from the bank I decided it was time for a articulated streamer, a 7 wt and a 250 grain sinking tip. Knowing the fish were tight in on the bank we didn’t change anything but switch from a dry to a streamer. In all honesty the action was much slower on the streamer but the fish that did show up to play were much bigger than that were interested in our dry offerings. We came around a eroded outside bend with some downed trees, my buddy placed the boat excellently and I made a cast back up stream into the pocket of a downed tree, just like I would with a hopper. As the streamer hit the water a large brown came off the bottom for a closer look, with one strip he closed the distance and on the second strip he committed to the eat. It was just as much or more of a visual eat than any of the dry fly eats from the morning and reminded me yet again to never underestimate summer time streamer fishing.

So if the wind is howling, the fish aren’t looking up, rain has stained the water or like this year with everything being 3-10 times higher than usual mix it up and throw on a streamer. I think you all might be pleasantly surprised.

In the summertime I like to fish a lot of white and other bright colors like yellow. But often times like the day mentioned above, olive is hard to beat.

Top three streamers you won’t catch me without in the summer. Sasquatch in white and olive, Circus Peanut in olive and crawdad , Chubby Muffin Sculpin in olive and brown.

 

 

 

Typically no one thinks of fishing streamers in the middle of summer. Especially not when fish are looking up for terrestrials, caddis or large stoneflies. In all honesty several of my best streamers days have been had in June through September, not late fall like typically thought. Last year one of my nicest and most memorable fish came after a stelar morning of fishing large attractor dries while floating the South Fork of the Snake . The morning started out great and the fish were eating hoppers and attractor dries very well, until the gale force winds kicked up in the afternoon. After 45 minutes of struggling to deliver a bushy dry inches from the bank I decided it was time for a articulated streamer, a 7 wt and a 250 grain sinking tip. Knowing the fish were tight in on the bank we didn’t change anything but switch from a dry to a streamer. In all honesty the action was much slower on the streamer but the fish that did show up to play were much bigger than that were interested in our dry offerings. We came around a eroded outside bend with some downed trees, my buddy placed the boat excellently and I made a cast back up stream into the pocket of a downed tree, just like I would with a hopper. As the streamer hit the water a large brown came off the bottom for a closer look, with one strip he closed the distance and on the second strip he committed to the eat. It was just as much or more of a visual eat than any of the dry fly eats from the morning and reminded me yet again to never underestimate summer time streamer fishing.

So if the wind is howling, the fish aren’t looking up, rain has stained the water or like this year with everything being 3-10 times higher than usual mix it up and throw on a streamer. I think you all might be pleasantly surprised.

Summer time I like to fish a lot of white and other bright colors like yellow. But often times like the day mentioned olive is hard to beat.

Tope three streamers you won’t catch me without in the summer. Sasquatch in white and olive, Circus Peanut in olive and crawdad , Chubby Muffin Sculpin in olive and brown.

Tying The Albright Knot

The Albright Knot is a very strong connection from your fly line to your leader or butt section.  It can also be used to attach a fly line to backing.  The strength of this knot comes from the core of the fly line being doubled over and incorporated in the knot.  Some knots rely simply on tightening into the coating of the line which, under high pressure, can slip off.

  1. Start by doubling the fly line over and threading your butt section material though the loop that was created.
  2. Wrap the tag end back around both legs of the loop and the butt section material several times.
  3. Thread the tag end back through the loop the same direction it came through initially.
  4. As the knot is tightened, work the wraps as close to the top of the loop as possible (without the butt section material slipping off the fly line loop).  Pull everything tight and trim the end of the fly line that is exposed from the knot.
  5. In theory, that is the end of the Albright Knot, but it tends to have a pretty abrupt edge that doesn’t feed through the eyes of the fly rod very well.  To remedy this we can tie a quick jam-knot using the tag end of the butt section material.  Wrap the tag around the main line four times.
  6. Now, wrap the loop around the main line as well.
  7. Slowly pull the tag end to tighten everything down.  Use saliva or water to moisten the knot as it is secured.
  8. Trim the final tag end.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Tying The Homer Rhode Double Overhand Loop Knot

The Homer Rhode Double Overhand Loop Knot is a great variation on the basic Homer Rhode Loop Knot.  This knot adds one more tightening point in the knot to keep it from slipping out.  A good solid loop knot is invaluable when fishing streamers and saltwater flies and you need them to have the best action possible.  A traditional clinch-type knot will restrict fly movement, where a loop will allow it to perform at its best.

  1. Before threading the line through the eye of the hook, tie a double overhand knot and slowly tighten it (but not all the way).  Often times the know will flip into a figure-eight on its own.  If it doesn’t, you may need to encourage it to do so.
  2. Now take the line through the eye of the hook and back through the figure-eight as shown.
  3. Slowly tighten the figure-eight now and slide it down so that it is up against the eye of the hook.
  4. Tie a single overhand around the main line with the tag end.  Snug it fairly tight.
  5. Simply hold the fly and pull the main line and the two knots will slide together and tighten, while leaving a nice loop between the knot and the fly.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Color combinations are endless.

Dubbing Mixing Tutorial

When Senyo’s Laser Yarn first hit the market I snatched some up and hit the vise. Great product and I really dig the concept. But there were a few things I wasn’t quite stoked on like color options, the flash used and the short wispy yarn like base. So as always my first thought was “make your own”. But we all know how easy blending long natural fibers with synthetics or flash can be. Until now I just blended small amounts by hand like everyone else since all other methods either tangle of break the fibers. It was a tedious method and I hated it so my mind started to chew on a better method. Then bam, while thinking I needed to brush the dog it hit me, what about working two brushes like paddles against each other hopefully aligning and blending the fibers together without tangles or broken fibers? Within 5 minutes I had a ziplock bag full of the good stuff and haven’t looked back since.

 

 

 

Tying the Improved Blood Knot

The Improved Blood Knot is great for connecting a smaller line to a larger line (like lighter class tippet to heavy shock or bite material).

  1. Double your lighter tippet over to create a loop and lay the two tag ends side-by-side, facing the opposite direction.
  2. Wrap the loop around the other line several times and then bring it back through the “V” created.  It is important to remember whether you went down into the “V” or up from underneath.  Either is fine, you just need to do the opposite with the other tag end.
  3. Take the other tag end and wrap it around the other line several times then through the hole (that used to be the “V”).  Again make sure you take it through the opposite direction from the original tag end.
  4. Lubricate the knot and pull everything tight simultaneously.
  5. Trim the tag ends.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

Tying the Blood Knot

The Blood Knot is a standard in all type of fishing from freshwater to saltwater.  Use it to join two strands of line together that are of similar diameter.  The Blood Knot creates a really nice, low profile that goes through your guides easily.

  1. Lay the two tag ends side-by-side, facing the opposite direction.
  2. Wrap one of the tag ends around the other line several times and then bring it back through the “V” created.  It is important to remember whether you went down into the “V” or up from underneath.  Either is fine, we just need to do the opposite with the other tag end.
  3. Take the other tag end and wrap it around the other line several times then through the hole (that used to be the “V”).  Again make sure you take it through the opposite direction from the original tag end.
  4. Lubricate the knot and pull everything tight.
  5. Trim the tag ends.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

 

Clear Cure Goo Kit

Ten Things That Should Be On Every Fly Tying Desk

Tying desk, dungeon, fly lair, man cave, the place you lock yourself in away from the kids and wife. What ever you call it you probably spend too much time there as do I. If you’re going to spend that much time somewhere you might as well make it a nice place to be. Ya know maybe add some nice lighting or a place to store some tasty malted beverages close to hand? Over the years my fly room has changed and morphed to improve productivity and comfort. Here are the top 10 essentials at my desk. I didn’t include music because that is a absolute must and a given! May I recommend some Black Keys or a little Black Sabbath?

  1. Griffin Montana Mongoose: I tied for years on a Renzetti until I got some vise time on a Mongoose 3 years back. I’ve been tying on one ever since and haven’t looked back. From sub 20′s all the way up to 8/0 hooks I’ve never had a problem with holding power. Considering it comes with a stem extension, c-clamp, pedestal base, a supreme bobbin and a hackle gauge I’d say it’s also one of the best values in vise out as well.
  2. Clear Cure Goo: Because epoxy or a UV curing adhesive is a must at the tying desk. And if you’re going to have one you might as well have the best. The best part is that it comes in flexible, thick, thin, brush-able and a few different kinds of tack free.
  3. Yarn indicator brush: I use this tool as much or more than anything else at the vise. It’s the ultimate tool for picking and teasing out materials.
  4. Mini Fridge full of PBR: What else are you going to stock it with! Natty light or Coors? I don’t think so.
  5. Loctite: Almost every fly I tie gets some loctite somewhere. I use it to prevent flash from fouling, glue in a rattle, stick on some eyes or finish a head.
  6. Ottlite: Probably one of my favorite things in the tying dungeon! Errrr um I mean favorite 3 things now that I’ve added a couple since the first. There is nothing worse than tying under some dim cheap light at night matching colors for hours just to find out when you get on the water the next morning to find out all the colors are off. Natural is key while at the vises!
  7. Box of Sharpies: I color a lot of materials in my flies. Foam to craft fur I’ve found sharpies to be extremely effect and color fast.
  8. Gamakatsu B10′s hooks: In my opinion one of the best tying hooks ever made. I go through them in 100 packs and they are my default hook for streamers. Extremely sharp, strong and a excellent gape there isn’t much more you ask for out of this hook. Well except maybe some 3/0 – 6/0 since the largest is a 2/0.
  9. 30 Lb Fluorocarbon: This is my go to for junctions on my articulated flies. I also use it for weed-guards, body extensions and making eyes.
  10. Henckles 3” embroidery scissors: By far the best tying scissors I’ve found. Period end of story!

 

 

rob4

Quija Nymphing

Last year, I took a friend who had never floated in a drift boat to float the A-section of the Green River.  It was mid-week, which meant that there were very few Floaties on the river.

I had placed my friend the pole position in the front of the boat in order to ensure he would have the best chance at an epic day.  My son was happily perched at the rear, with me on the oars. For anyone aspiring to boat ownership, this is where you end up most of the time; trading your fly-rod for graphite sticks of a much larger diameter.  The sun was intense and the water was high, but the incessant wind was noticeably absent.  The only action on the surface belonged to the fiberglass monsters flogging the water with strips of nylon.  After serving up almost every dry-fly on the menu; the usual suspects like cicadas, hoppers, and crickets, I started visually poaching for ideas by watching the guides in other boats.  I really wanted my friend, who is a capable angler, to catch something, anything.  If someone tells you they haven’t been skunked on the water, they are either lying or selling something, or both.  Most of the guides had their clients nymphing,  DEEP.  A couple of them were throwing rigs fished with weights which looked more at home at Gold’s Gym than on a river.  That being said, their sports were catching fish. My friend didn’t want to nymph fish and instead opted to throw a streamer.  I understood, as it is a lot more fun to cast and strip than to lob barbells.  As effective as nymph fishing is, and I do it all the time, it is a bit like using a Ouija Board, or having sex with a condom; you are never really sure you are communicating with the other side until something dramatic happens.

After a few hours without so much as a sniff, I began to feel the pressure.  I set my son up with a nymph rig hoping to change our luck. He is a novice fly-fisher who, prior to this trip had only thrown dry flies. Within two casts, the drought was over. He proved to be surprisingly adept at hooking the anchor line.  After three repeat performances, he asked for a beetle pattern and a sandwich.

Again, I turned my attention to the other boats, specifically the ones routinely catching fish.  Ethics aside, I made a mental note to throw a pair of binoculars in the boat for the next trip. The closest boat was racking up double hook-ups faster than a fish increases in size when it is “unintentionally released”. I noticed that the anglers consistently catching fish were set up with a two fly rig with the weights tied below the flies, sometimes called dredge or bounce nymphing rig.  Not sure how I feel about this set up. I can’t help but assume that the angler in the front of the boat was bonking fish on the head with his weights while the angler in the back was snagging them.  At the time, my friend decided to stick with the streamer, which eventually yielded some results, not epic results, but results nonetheless. Speaking of results, the guides who set up their clients with the dredge rig were definitely achieving them, which for them is their living.  Far be it for me to deprive a person from earning a living. Ethical questions are rarely black and white, so it appears we have another issue upon which to float, and wade, into the gray.

 

 

Bimini Twist Loop Knot

The Bimini Twist is one of the most important knots most fly fisherman should know, but it is also one of the most intimidating.  Well, it shouldn’t be.  With a little practice almost anyone can become quite proficient at it.  The Bimini Twist is great for creating loops in mono or backing while maintaining the materials full breaking strength.

  1. Begin by creating a loop and twist it using your hand to rotate inside the loop.  You should create 20-25 twists in the line.
  2. Attach the loop to something secure (ie-a cleat in the boat, your knee, your toe, a post of some kind), just be sure you don’t damage the line in the process. Our anchor is notated by “A” in our diagram.
  3. This is the tricky part…use your finger or a pen (“B” in the diagram) to pull the wraps (making the loop slightly larger).  The tension from the tightening of the wraps will allow the tag end to spin or wrap back down over the original wraps.  Cover the entire length of the original wraps with the new.
  4. Tie a half hitch around one of the legs.
  5. Tie a half hitch around the other leg.
  6. Tie a jam knot around both legs of the loop.
  7. Gently tighten the jam knot down towards the wraps.
  8. Trim the tag end.
  9. Secure the knot with super glue, Loon UV Knot Sense or Clear Cure Goo Flexible.

 

Illustrations by Greg Pearson

 

You can blend dubbing to achieve any color.

Fur Burger Fly Tying Tutorial

Hook: Gamakatsu B10s # 2
Eyes: Pseudo Eyes Plus Large
Tail: Craft Fur
Foul Guard: Calves Tail
Body and Head: Custom Blended Dubbing, one part wool one part mixed ice wing fiber.

I developed this baitfish pattern while fishing for late season Wipers. In the fall they feed heavily on gizzard shad and often times form surface boils. Even though it’s a total feeding frenzy they get selective on size and profile, especially later on in the season after they’ve been heavily pressured by conventional tackle anglers with plugs and large crank baits. Many of my friends do well on EP and Clouser Minnow but thats a little to plain jane for me and I prefer a pattern with maximum movement at rest as well on the move. This patter proved extremely effect and can be tied in any size, color or profile to match any bait fish you’d like to imitate.

 

 

 

You can read more about Nick Granato on his blog at http://www.flyobsession.com