Tag Archives: Conservation

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Trout Unlimited Launches The Wild Steelhead Initiative

**Editors Note: I have yet to personally delve into the world of the anadromous fish. However after hearing coutless stories and accounts it is something I am very excited to get into.  Everyone I speak with talks about steelhead with such reverence. I hope to meet one of these beautiful creatures soon so I can speak about them with reverence as well. Please enjoy this awesome video put out by Trout Unlimited

Thanks,

JC

(Video and Article Originally From Angling Trade 11.24.2014)

On Nov. 20, Trout Unlimited launched the Wild Steelhead Initiative, an ambitious and hopeful project to protect and restore the wild steelhead and the fishing opportunities they provide throughout their native range in Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.  This is a major deal, as the nation’s leading coldwater conservation organization (with the largest budget, grassroots network, and national staff) is focusing efforts on the wild steelhead cause in a big way.

The heart of the Initiative will be a new community, Wild Steelheaders United, which is being established toinform, organize and activate anglers (regardless of preferred gear type)—and anyone who cares about these incredible fish—to protect and recover wild steelhead.  In short,Wild Steelheaders United is a home to anyone who believes in the common quest to protect these fish and the incredible fishing opportunities they provide.

The Initiative will focus on river systems that have high potential to support robust, fishable wild steelhead populations, while accepting that properly managed steelhead hatcheries may be appropriate to provide fishing and harvest opportunity in rivers that no longer have the capacity to support wild steelhead.TU

The Initiative will address both habitat protection/restoration and steelhead policy and management so that all of the “Hs” (habitat (including hydro), hatcheries, and harvest) are aligned so that wild steelhead can thrive.

TU kicked off kick-off this initiative with five simultaneous events in Seattle, Portland, Juneau, Santa Cruz, and Boise.  AT attended the Seattle event, and it was a full house, with plenty of positive mojo…

What Can You Do?  Get on board, and encourage your customers to do the same.  It costs nothing more than a simple online pledge.  It doesn’t matter if you’re a Michigan steelheader (like I am) or an aficionado of the Pacific Northwest.  We need to make a statement that wild fish matter.  This is the next big movement in the industry…

WSU

For more information please check out the Wild Steeheaders United webpage HERE.

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Helping Restore America’s Waterways: Orvis/TU 1,000 Mile Campaign

As many of us know Orvis and Trout Unlimited have been working hard to restore waterways and wetlands across the country for years now. Whether it’s pushing for dam removal or new legislation protecting vital rivers and streams, restoring eroding river banks or oyster reefs in the Chesapeake Bay. Today they have a new campaign, to reconnect 1,000 miles of river and streams by removing or rebuilding poorly constructed culverts that inhibit spawning fish to continue their journey upstream to reproduce. To find out how to do your part check out the video and visit Orvis or Trout Unlimited for more information.

Greenback Habitat

The Green Fish

I passionately enjoy catching genuine, pure-bred cutthroat trout.  Regarding the Greenback, there are places where this is possible, albeit catch & release–which suits me just fine.

Oh, wait—the Denver Post said a study of cutthroat genetics revealed that “pure greenbacks” only exist within a four mile section of Bear Creek, near Colorado Springs.  Which means…all other greenback populations are…lowly hybrids! Additionally, greenback cutts are native to the South Platte, but Bear Creek is a tributary of the Arkansas.  This fact alone calls into question whether or not they really are “pure greenbacks.”  The Center for Biological Diversity circulated a press release that says “some scientists believe [this population] to be a long-lost subspecies known as yellowfin cutthroat.”  Well, after more than two decades of recovery work and millions of dollars expended to save what turned out to be hybrids, we apparently know only one thing for certain—Greenbacks: the name fits!

 

So now, the Forest Service, Division of Wildlife, the City of Colorado Springs, Trout Unlimited, and a host of other interested parties are trying to figure out what to do next.  Motorcycles, mountainbikers, and trailriders can still use the trails, but fishing Bear Creek apparently is illegal.

Apparently, previous rescue efforts used cutthroat populations that were thought to be greenbacks, but were actually western slope hybrids.  My question is what happens now with these fish…we’ve already spent so much time, effort, and money on them.  Bill Edrington of Royal Gorge Anglers in Canon City, Colorado, says that the forest service now refers to these hybrid trout as “The Green Fish.”  This may be a wordplay referring not only to their color, but to cutthroat that were reared in the 1990’s in a tailwater creek of Fort Carson’s Townsend Reservoir.  When I served in the military, my unit camped near this reservoir during a training exercise.  I remember a senior officer told me that greenbacks had been stocked in the creek, but then a drought wiped out the population—all that greenback recovery time & money, erased.

As I recall, pretty much everyone was excited about the earlier greenback recovery efforts.  The general public seemed to think of this as a means to “give back” to the environment, to the cadence of the “go green” motto.  But Adrian Stanley relays in the Colorado Springs Independent that U.S. Fish & Wildlife’s Leith Edgar “…says the findings go to show that the moment we think we have nature figured out, science proves otherwise.”  It’s true; we must be good stewards of our fish & game, but what do we do now with “The Green Fish” hybrids?  After all, they may be small fish that rarely exceed 12 inches, but at least they’re pretty!