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Clinch

How It All Started

On the Clinch River in East Tennessee, west of interstate 75 as it bridges the water at breakneck speed is a mass of T.V.A. power lines that keep the City of Knoxville and points beyond supplied with electricity. The water beneath these lines is deep and clear, full of large rocks and twisted deadfall.

Wading isn’t an option in this stretch of the river, but the bank is often cluttered with corn cans that linger until high water flushes them further down stream. If you want to work the river from the bridge to the power lines a water craft of some sort is mandatory.

The Clinch isn’t a world class span of water, but it does hold a respectable population of browns, rainbows, and recently they added brooks to the foray. The size of the fish caught is usually in the mid sized variety though an occasional leviathan is spotted. This river in all its normalcy is special to me because it was in this place that I discovered my love of fly fishing.

It was the summer of my 40th birthday. Up to that point in my life I had been a basic bank fishing worm dunker. The most exotic angling I ever ventured to do was cast a Jitterbug or Hoola Popper to pond bass.

The overall vision of river fishing in my mind was sitting on the bank pitching chicken liver for catfish.

My best friend had been fly fishing for a while and despite his persistent urging that I give it a try, I remained resistant. It seemed like to much work to catch a tiny fish, and frankly it just looked to hard to be fun. His consistent assurance that I would love it was respectfully dodged till my birthday.

With some money I had been given as a gift, I bit the bullet and purchased some gear. The rod was a nine foot five/six weight Phlueger combo with double taper line that I got for thirty five bucks at Wal-Mart. This seemed to me like a total waste of money, but I guessed that I could put a spinning reel on it and bluegill fish.

When I got home I called my buddy and set the fishing trip for the following Saturday. He told me to pick up some flies, we set the time, and my fate was sealed.

Selecting flies for my first trip was the equivalent of trying to translate the Magna Carta into Mandarin. The Friday before my trip, I went to a fly shop on the west end of town. It was a small place tucked at the very back of an old strip mall. Several trucks were parked out front, I pulled in along side them and peered through the mosaic of stickers adorning the window.

Gathering my nerve, I walked in the door and was immediately greeted by and old black lab who bumped me with his graying muzzle. I rubbed his head and walked on in, trying to look like I knew what I was doing. I am quite sure that I looked as lost and out of place as a Nascar fan at a performance of Swan Lake.

“Can I help you?”, the guy behind the counter asked. He was polite enough, but his voice held a hint of indifference which implied either I had walked into the wrong store, or I was as lost as a ball in high weeds. It didn’t take him very long to get me figured out.

“I’m heading up to the Clinch. What are they hitting?” Let me just state now for the record that if you go into a fly shop and ask that question, you might as well have a red flag dangling over your head. I am sure the guy behind the counter could see the donkey ears and buck teeth protruding from my face.

“Pheasant Tail”

He may as well have said Pig Ears.

“Do you have any?” Oh, this was getting bad. By now the donkey tail had emerged from my back and a Hee-Haw was welling up in my throat.

“Over there in the flies.”

“What size?”

“Twenty.”

I looked around and found the tray that said Bead Head Pheasant Tail size twenty. It was the only slot that was nearly empty. Just a small was of very small hoods with tiny gold beads.

At this point I was sure that this guy was playing me. I could hardly see the eye of the hook let alone try to fish with this thing.

Embarrassed, I picked up a few, put them in a cup, paid my money, and walked out with my donkey ears drooping and my fly swatting tail tucked meekly between my legs.

The lab looked up at me sympathetically from his spot by the t-shirt rack. I felt like he had seen this all happen many times before.

I am an information junkie. When I get interested in something, I devour as much as I can to learn about the intricacies of whatever the subject might be. I had spent several days scowering the internet on everything i could about fly fishing. I watched videos of Joan Wulff and Lefty Kreh as they showed the basic mechanics of the cast. I would sit at my desk with a thick highlighter and practice ten and two, ten and two.

So, returning from the debacle at the fly shop, I strung up my rod and went outside to practice. The one thing I remember is hearing that awful crack each time I came forward with my cast. My research had informed me that unless I carried a suitcase of flies to the river with me, I needed to fix that issue. I slowed down my ten and two and finally reached the point that I could lay down a solid ten feet of line in front of me without issue. By nightfall I felt okay with my cast much in the same way a teenage boy feels okay around a girl that he knows is way out of his league. He likes it, he enjoys it, but in the back of his mind he knows that once she sees through his charm to the large zit on the end of his nose, the whole gig is up.

I guess in retrospect, it was a blessing that we were fishing from a boat. I had fished area lakes in a boat many times so I kinda know the score. This also meant that I didn’t have to buy waders, but I had seen enough about fly fishing to know that I had to have a vest to hold my gear. Downstairs, in a bag of old yard sale stuff, I found a cheap khaki hunting vest that would have looked good on Marlin Perkins or Jack Hannah, but me? Not so much. Of course I had nothing to put in it but a plastic cup of Pheasant Tails and a three pack of leaders. Minimalism at its finest.

Saturday morning. The big day had arrived. I was up and gone before daybreak. The boat ramp that was our rendezvous point was about forty minutes away from the house and as I drove I tried to run through what I had read. I was actually getting nervous! Not about the fishing part of it, I had been catching fish my whole life. I was nervous about how I was catching them. I hate being labeled a greenhorn.

Its funny how odd things linger in your memory. The first thing I noticed when I reached the boat ramp and stepped out of my ride is how much colder it was right at the river, and I thought to myself that the water would have to warm up a bunch before the fish would feed. Shows you how much I knew.

Neither my buddy nor I are small boys. Our collective weight would bring top dollar at a cattle auction, so when he showed up with our watercraft I began to get worried. The “boat” was a hard plastic kayak kinda thing that was small and light enough for him to load in the back of his truck, and when we shoved off and headed upstream it did not escape my attention that we were mere inches from taking on water, yet remarkably it moved our middle aged spreads across the surface quite well.

We rowed upstream for several minutes through a thin wisp of fog that hovered inches above the water. Occasionally I would see a ring of a fish on the surface but other than their interruption the river was smooth as glass. I was amazed at how quiet everything became as we headed toward my date with destiny.

When we stopped rowing and set the boat free, I cast and fixed my gaze on the orange stick on foam indicator. I really didn’t know what to expect; then it happened. I have no real recollection of the hookset, or the fight, all I remember is that the indicator went under and then I was holding a 12″ brown. I was amazed at how smooth and cold it was, and how this was the prettiest fish I had ever seen.

“Meet your mistress.”, my buddy said with a twinkle in his eye.

Another boat, a real honest to God boat with room and a trolling motor came downstream to us. I knew the two guys from highschool and after a few pleasantries it was suggested that I get in with them so I could stand up and cast. That is when things started to get interesting.

I made an ungraceful but successful transition from the tiny craft that required my friend and I sit and cast to a large boat in which I could stand.  This made things much easier.

I was placed in the center of the craft and after some good natured ribbing targeted at my buddy and the realization of just how rediculous we must have looked going down river in something that looked more like a bath toy than something two grown men would ride.  The trolling motor was engaged and we headed back upstream and my new guide gave me some ground rules; Don’t get your feet tangled in the fly line, make sure that when you land a fish, you don’t lean over the side of the boat to far, and when you are casting make sure you say “casting!”.  This last one was of particular importance with three grown men in the boart and it did not escape my notice later on in the morning that when I said “casting!”, they froze and kinda leaned away from me.

We had a brief conversation about how the day had gone so far, what fly I was using, what I had been up to since high school.  Looking back on it now, I am sure that he made a quick inspection of my gear and no doubt rolled his eyes.  I mean this guy has one of just about every Hardy rod known to man and here is this 40 year old greenhorn standing in his boat with a yardsale hunting vest, a Wal-Mart rod and reel combo, and this bright greenish yellow double taper fly line.  I am sure I looked smoooooooooth.

These guys were laying out forty or fifty feet of line with ease and I would frail about like I was one step away from turning a cartwheel and might occasionaly get twenty feet of line out of the rod tip.  These guys were also catching fish.  A lot of fish.  I on the other hand was slowly being induced into a hypnotic state by the orange indicator that bobbed along unhindered in the current.  I watched helplessly as hookset after hookset occured on either side of me.  I was amazed.  All three of us were using pretty much the same fly but thus far the results had been desidedly different.

I don’t know if there is any information out there to support the impact of high tension power lines and their effect on the feeding activity of aquatic life forms, but as bad as I was at this fly fishing stuff, I can only attribute what happened next to the genius of Thomas Edison and Ben Franklin.  As we crossed under the power lines, the indicator I was staring at, the indicator which had indicated nothing but my ineptitude for hours…moved.  It wasn’t aggressive, it just slowly and steadily began sinking deeper and deeper in the water.  I had hung up on rocks and tree limbs all day and was down to just two or three flies in my plastic cup so I gave a quick tug to try and pull it free.

Then, from the bottom of the Clinch River, under the shadows of the power lines, not ten feet off the side of the boat, something pulled back!  A wave of nausea washed over me as I felt the strong pull of something that was fighting for its life.

“FISH ON!”, I cried.

“My God, I’d say so!” came the reply.

My rod was bent midway and whatever it was, was big and had swam under the boat.  I began shaking and honestly could not feel my legs.

The fight seemed to go on forever and when the net was dispatched a huge rainbow trout was brought on board.  The biggest fish of the day for all of us.

I would love to say that after a gratuitous grip and grin photo op, I gently placed this football with fins back in the water and watched as it settled into its natural place.  But I didn’t.  I kept it.  Not so much for the meal that it would soon provide, but for my ability to show it to my wife.

“Oh my gosh! That is a trout?”, she would say a few hours later.

She had the same misconception about these cold water gems as I did.

As I dressed out the fish that evening and prepared it for the oven, I caught myself planning my next trip.

Those power lines may not hold any valid effect on the fishing, but for me it is a magic place.  A place where passion was born…three feet under a little orange indicator.

 

 

Clear Cure Goo Kit

Ten Things That Should Be On Every Fly Tying Desk

Tying desk, dungeon, fly lair, man cave, the place you lock yourself in away from the kids and wife. What ever you call it you probably spend too much time there as do I. If you’re going to spend that much time somewhere you might as well make it a nice place to be. Ya know maybe add some nice lighting or a place to store some tasty malted beverages close to hand? Over the years my fly room has changed and morphed to improve productivity and comfort. Here are the top 10 essentials at my desk. I didn’t include music because that is a absolute must and a given! May I recommend some Black Keys or a little Black Sabbath?

  1. Griffin Montana Mongoose: I tied for years on a Renzetti until I got some vise time on a Mongoose 3 years back. I’ve been tying on one ever since and haven’t looked back. From sub 20′s all the way up to 8/0 hooks I’ve never had a problem with holding power. Considering it comes with a stem extension, c-clamp, pedestal base, a supreme bobbin and a hackle gauge I’d say it’s also one of the best values in vise out as well.
  2. Clear Cure Goo: Because epoxy or a UV curing adhesive is a must at the tying desk. And if you’re going to have one you might as well have the best. The best part is that it comes in flexible, thick, thin, brush-able and a few different kinds of tack free.
  3. Yarn indicator brush: I use this tool as much or more than anything else at the vise. It’s the ultimate tool for picking and teasing out materials.
  4. Mini Fridge full of PBR: What else are you going to stock it with! Natty light or Coors? I don’t think so.
  5. Loctite: Almost every fly I tie gets some loctite somewhere. I use it to prevent flash from fouling, glue in a rattle, stick on some eyes or finish a head.
  6. Ottlite: Probably one of my favorite things in the tying dungeon! Errrr um I mean favorite 3 things now that I’ve added a couple since the first. There is nothing worse than tying under some dim cheap light at night matching colors for hours just to find out when you get on the water the next morning to find out all the colors are off. Natural is key while at the vises!
  7. Box of Sharpies: I color a lot of materials in my flies. Foam to craft fur I’ve found sharpies to be extremely effect and color fast.
  8. Gamakatsu B10′s hooks: In my opinion one of the best tying hooks ever made. I go through them in 100 packs and they are my default hook for streamers. Extremely sharp, strong and a excellent gape there isn’t much more you ask for out of this hook. Well except maybe some 3/0 – 6/0 since the largest is a 2/0.
  9. 30 Lb Fluorocarbon: This is my go to for junctions on my articulated flies. I also use it for weed-guards, body extensions and making eyes.
  10. Henckles 3” embroidery scissors: By far the best tying scissors I’ve found. Period end of story!

 

 

rob4

Quija Nymphing

Last year, I took a friend who had never floated in a drift boat to float the A-section of the Green River.  It was mid-week, which meant that there were very few Floaties on the river.

I had placed my friend the pole position in the front of the boat in order to ensure he would have the best chance at an epic day.  My son was happily perched at the rear, with me on the oars. For anyone aspiring to boat ownership, this is where you end up most of the time; trading your fly-rod for graphite sticks of a much larger diameter.  The sun was intense and the water was high, but the incessant wind was noticeably absent.  The only action on the surface belonged to the fiberglass monsters flogging the water with strips of nylon.  After serving up almost every dry-fly on the menu; the usual suspects like cicadas, hoppers, and crickets, I started visually poaching for ideas by watching the guides in other boats.  I really wanted my friend, who is a capable angler, to catch something, anything.  If someone tells you they haven’t been skunked on the water, they are either lying or selling something, or both.  Most of the guides had their clients nymphing,  DEEP.  A couple of them were throwing rigs fished with weights which looked more at home at Gold’s Gym than on a river.  That being said, their sports were catching fish. My friend didn’t want to nymph fish and instead opted to throw a streamer.  I understood, as it is a lot more fun to cast and strip than to lob barbells.  As effective as nymph fishing is, and I do it all the time, it is a bit like using a Ouija Board, or having sex with a condom; you are never really sure you are communicating with the other side until something dramatic happens.

After a few hours without so much as a sniff, I began to feel the pressure.  I set my son up with a nymph rig hoping to change our luck. He is a novice fly-fisher who, prior to this trip had only thrown dry flies. Within two casts, the drought was over. He proved to be surprisingly adept at hooking the anchor line.  After three repeat performances, he asked for a beetle pattern and a sandwich.

Again, I turned my attention to the other boats, specifically the ones routinely catching fish.  Ethics aside, I made a mental note to throw a pair of binoculars in the boat for the next trip. The closest boat was racking up double hook-ups faster than a fish increases in size when it is “unintentionally released”. I noticed that the anglers consistently catching fish were set up with a two fly rig with the weights tied below the flies, sometimes called dredge or bounce nymphing rig.  Not sure how I feel about this set up. I can’t help but assume that the angler in the front of the boat was bonking fish on the head with his weights while the angler in the back was snagging them.  At the time, my friend decided to stick with the streamer, which eventually yielded some results, not epic results, but results nonetheless. Speaking of results, the guides who set up their clients with the dredge rig were definitely achieving them, which for them is their living.  Far be it for me to deprive a person from earning a living. Ethical questions are rarely black and white, so it appears we have another issue upon which to float, and wade, into the gray.

 

 

You can blend dubbing to achieve any color.

Fur Burger Fly Tying Tutorial

Hook: Gamakatsu B10s # 2
Eyes: Pseudo Eyes Plus Large
Tail: Craft Fur
Foul Guard: Calves Tail
Body and Head: Custom Blended Dubbing, one part wool one part mixed ice wing fiber.

I developed this baitfish pattern while fishing for late season Wipers. In the fall they feed heavily on gizzard shad and often times form surface boils. Even though it’s a total feeding frenzy they get selective on size and profile, especially later on in the season after they’ve been heavily pressured by conventional tackle anglers with plugs and large crank baits. Many of my friends do well on EP and Clouser Minnow but thats a little to plain jane for me and I prefer a pattern with maximum movement at rest as well on the move. This patter proved extremely effect and can be tied in any size, color or profile to match any bait fish you’d like to imitate.

 

 

 

You can read more about Nick Granato on his blog at http://www.flyobsession.com

Always great conversation during floats...

A Short List of Fly Fishers that I would love to have lunch with…

…or, even better, spend a day on the water with.  Honestly, this was a very difficult list to come up with.  Not because there are few, but because there are so many accomplished anglers both past and present.  One could easily list their top 25, or even top 50, and still feel like important people are being left out.   That all being said, my list is a little skewed (as yours will be too) based on my current angling pursuits.  Here are mine, in no specific order:

Lefty Kreh – What hasn’t Lefty done?  He is a pioneer in just about every aspect of fly fishing techniques, but especially in saltwater.  He developed the fly “Lefty’s Deceiver” and it was featured on  a US Postal Service Stamp.  Lefty has become synonymous with fly casting instruction.  http://www.leftykreh.com

Lee Wulff – Of course we all know Lee Wulff as the father of catch and release and his famous quote “game fish are too valuable to be only caught once.”  The other aspect about Lee Wulff was his constant pushing of the envelope with equipment.  He led the charge of fishing for Atlantic Salmon with a single hand rod, bucking the English trend of using two-handers.  He was also rumored to be able to tie size a size 28 fly WITHOUT the use of a vise.

Brian O’Keefe – Brian has traveled the world fishing all of the places and for all the fish that we all dream of.  If there is an angler we should live through vicariously, it is Brian.  And, just when we are in complete awe of his accomplishments, he will make a beautiful cast just to prove he is completely untouchable.  Photography is also a big part of Brian’s repertoire and it would be great to pick his brain about all of the above.  http://www.brianokeefephotos.com/

Andy Mill – All I can say is Tarpon.  Andy, literally wrote the modern day book on fishing for Tarpon with a fly rod (A Passion For Tarpon).  He was a world class downhill ski racer before turning his focus on the Silver King.  His dedication to the art and preservation of these great fish is a wonderful thing to see in these modern times.  If nothing else, Andy will teach you a reverence for Tarpon.

Dec Hogan – Dec has written the bible for Steelhead (A Passion For Steelhead).  If you consider yourself a steelheader and have not read this book, shame on you.  Dec has immersed his life in the art of two-handed casting, tying steelhead flies, understanding the species and their preservation.  I would love to sit on a bank and watch him dissect and work a steelhead run.

Billy Pate – Another legend in Tarpon fishing, Billy was a very accomplished saltwater angler.  In addition to his world record tarpon, he is the first to ever catch a Black Marlin on a fly and the first to catch all six species of billfish on a fly.  An accomplishment that likely required an awful lot of patience and persistence.

Bob Clouser – Can you say Clouser Minnow?!?  I am such a fan of this fly, that I think I could fish an entire year with nothing but variations of it.  From Trout to Muskie to Saltwater, everything eats Clouser Minnows.  http://www.clouserflyfishing.com/

Scott Sanchez – If ever there is a mad-scientist of fly tying, Scott would definitely be in the running for the title.  A master innovator at the vise, his flies are different and effective.  One of my favorite quotes from Scott reads something like this: “Most of my flies are illegal in California from all the lead and chemicals that are used in tying them.”  Many of his flies are effective on multiple species as Scott likes to chase just about anything that swims and will eat a fly.

Barry Reynolds – Another authority on his respective subject, Barry has become an expert on catching pike and muskie with a fly rod.  His book “Mastering Pike on the Fly” is loaded with so much information, it is really a testament to the time and effort that he has put into pursuing his quarry.  Barry has travelled extensively to chase the long fish and it shows in his knowledge and effectiveness.  http://www.barryreynoldsflyfishing.com/

Tom Bie – Here is an angler that has done it all (if not all, most of it), but his real accomplishment is his network within the fly fishing industry and creating THE magazine for the soul of fly fishing.  There are lots of fly fishing magazines out there, but none capture the essence like the Drake.  Others have popped up, but the Drake is still the benchmark…imitation is the purest form of flattery.  http://www.drakemag.com/

I must close by saying that there are many people that I currently have the honor to spend time on the water with that could very easily be on this list.  I have also fished with some amazing guides that, regardless of how good the fishing was, are the kind of people that I want to call friends.  To those that I am constantly learning from, comparing notes and just plain having a good time with…  Thank you!

Now, who would be on your list?  Comment below…

 

Ten Questions with SA’s Jeff Wieringa

We sat down with Scientific Angler’s Jeff Wieringa and asked him ten questions.  If you don’t know Jeff, you should.  You probably owe a lot of the innovations in fly fishing to his mad-scientist type mind.  He is inventor of Sharkskin and the designer of the new Scientific Anglers waterproof fly boxes.  Jeff was the owner of JW Outfitters before being acquired by 3M/Scientific Anglers.  Enjoy!

  1. FW: Tell us about your start in the angling trade.
    JW:
    My real start was when I was 12 years old and I invented a device that put Zeks floating cheese on a treble hook and compressed it on so it wouldn’t falloff when you cast it . It was very simple made from a 30 cal bullet shell. (See image below). I called it the Master Baiter, I of course had no idea why my mother got so mad about the name. My real start in fly fishing was in 1989 when I designed and manufactured a line of packs, tying bags and pontoon boats under the name of JW Outfitters. That business grew very fast and after 11 years I sold that company to 3M/Scientific Anglers. This is where I still work to this day. I have spent 9 years in the lab designing and engineering products for Scientific Anglers. I now am the Business Development Manager for the business.
  2. FW: What can you tell us about the ideas behind coming out with sharkskin and textured fly lines?
    JW :
    While working in the lab at SA we wanted to try and make a fly line float better. I knew we had taken a line about as far as it could go with floatation with micro balloons and  AST. I started to research how insects are able to walk on water. There is where I learned that roughness can reverse the adhesive properties of water known as Meniscus Force. So the challenge began.I started trying to figure out how small of a profile I needed to emboss onto the line to start making a difference. After figuring that out I had to devise a way to put the texture into the line surface. Not easy. It took two years with dozens of failures and one day it seemed to all come together and I was able to build lines one after another with out any defects.Then all of us in the lab went out fishing the new lines and we were all in shock of how easy they cast, floated, roll cast and had low memory. That was the beginning of the Sharkskin revolution.
  3. FW: The afore mention lines are giving anglers a new advantage. Do you worry about any enemies you might have made in the animal kingdom? i.e gang of back alley tarpon or a posse of burly permit.
    JW:
    I am sure there are some that have an issue with the advantages that our lines bring. I cannot say if those are all fish or not. I did see a guy hook a gator once with a fly using our line.
  4. FW: In the credits of the movie Drift by Confluence Films it gives thanks to “jw and the lab rats at SA”.  Can you elaborate on who the rats are/ what they do at SA?
    JW:Sure, When you take on a project of this magnitude you have a vast amount of talented individuals to pull help from here in the 3M labs. We have PHDs and fish heads here. They (we) are affectionately known as lab rats. There is Del Kauss (line designer) Tim Pommer (product developer and assisted with the sharkskin development) Dale Wiehe ( chemical engineer for SA) John Stark (head lab rat) Bruce Richards ( rock star, line developer and probably one of the top 10 casters in the world) Brett Fortier ( assisted in Sharkskin development).So there is a full team here at SA working on lines, fly boxes and many other accessories. The producer of the movie Drift is a personal friend of mine and also worked at SA many years ago. So we sponsored him by giving lines to him and the crew to use during the filming. So he wanted to thank all of us here at SA.
  5. FW: Kenny Rogers, Kenny Loggins, or Kenny G? And Why?
    JW:
    Kenny Rogers is OK because he dated Dolly Parton. I wouldn’t listen to Kenny G because that is Dustin Carlson’s fav. It would have to be Kenny Loggins for “I’m All Right” from Caddy Shack, which is the best golf movie every made.
  6. FW: Scientific Anglers always seems to be on the forefront of new fly line design. What can you tell us about the development/ testing that goes into new fly line design?
    JW:
    Our lab is constantly working on fly lines. People would be in shock if they new how many lines we destroy on a daily basis. It is our number one priority to develop new lines continuously. This does not include new tapers and colors but also includes new compositions and surface technologies such as Sharkskin. It is important to remember that Scientific Anglers is the company that made modern day lines float with micro-balloons and to sink with tungsten. That is what the foundation of our mother company 3M provides us.
  7. FW: Can you confirm or deny any rumors that 3M might be involved in time travel?
    JW:
    We invented the time travel machine that was used in Napoleon Dynamite but abandoned the project for obvious reasons. That engineer is now developing a device that will be able to tie flys with out any humans involved. We will finally be able to sell flies that will be 100% machined tied. Just think we will soon be able to remove the word Hand from Hand Tied Flies.
  8. FW: What is your home-water?
    JW: I am from California and did almost all of my fly fishing in the Sierras. I actually combined my love of backpacking with fly fishing.
  9. FW: Random fact?
    JW: I hate liver, but doesn’t everyone? Afraid of clowns and mimes. I have been married twenty eight years to the same woman, Connie. Wish I would have bought Apple stock at $12.
  10. FW: Favorite Scientific Anglers product?
    JW: I think the old school System II reels are awesome. For current stuff it would have to be Sharkskin GPX or the new Mastery Textured Nymph for the new DRYTIP that we have incorporated in them. Actually all of our Sharkskin and Mastery Textured floating lines include the new DRYTIP improved technology. Another shamless plug is our lines now have SA ID which in short is writing on the line to tell you what model and weight the line is.

 

A special thanks to Scott “Scoot” Silvers for his help with this article.

 

 

First Sleepwalking, Now Sleep Fly Tying???

Doctors Orders: Take one Ambien (a sleeping pill with apparently some side effects) before bedtime and tie a fly while you sleep.

Apparently, I did just that.  I awoke to find this little size #18 baetis nymph in my vise.  Different from the baetis I normally tie, I vaguely remember dreaming about tying this fly and blending the dubbing to form the thorax.  Sure enough, the thorax is blended just as I remember in the dream.

Now, where did that entire ham that was in the refrigerator go?

 

 

Scoot realizes the results - knows he should have done it sooner.

More Non-Fishing Uses For Fly Tying Materials

With the craze of all the ladies putting feathers in their hair (see our recent post about this), we started thinking about all the materials we have in our fly tying department.  Our findings…the fly tying selection also doubles as a fashion gold mine!  As we stood looking at all the possibilities, we were overwhelmed with all good that we could do in the world, fashion and otherwise.  We thought we could take great fly tying materials and use them to improve a few unfortunate soul’s quality of life.  Here is a sampling of our experiments and case studies.

Case Study #1

Hillary, being a girl and all, has always had a bad case of mustache envy. She considered taking some heavy doses of hormones, but that could lead to some pretty bad side-effects.  A risk that she wasn’t willing to take.  Not to worry…we chose a nice  juicy patch of arctic fox hair and with the help of a little swax (fly tying wax), we were able to shape this beauty. The best part is how well the color matches her hair, it could easily be mistaken for her own.  A mustache this epic hides her smile, but you can see the happiness in her eyes.  Now she has to learn how to eat without leaving bits of food for later…

Case Study #2

Jason was tragically born without eyebrows.  We know, we know…tragedy doesn’t even begin to describe the pain.  We thought about drawing some on for him- a la Uncle Leo…”Woah, woah, no need to get angry.  I don’t care for your demeanor.”- but we knew we could do better.  He is shown here wearing our newly designed rabbit-strip eyebrows.  Now Jason, go out into the world, be proud and show it what you are made of!

Case Study #3

Lara has always been unable to get her ears pierced, due to a strange fear of straight sharp needles. Well Lara, you are in luck! From a distance, we can make a perfect cast and “pierce” your ear before you even know what happened.  “Most” of the time, we are dead-on with our cast and Lara was the lucky one.  Even better, we didn’t use a straight needle…our tool of choice was a size two intruder hook.   The question is, can we complete the impossible and take care of the other ear without any trips to the emergency room.  Enjoy your new intruder-style bling!

Case Study # 4

This may very well be our proudest accomplishment.  Scoot has always had trouble with his confidence, which translated into trouble with the ladies.  We couldn’t figure out what the problem was and after a few mistrials, we were pretty frustrated.  Like everything we do, we never, ever gave up.  Then…BAM…we got it!  Let us introduce you to the new and improved Scoot sporting our very stylish bucktail chest hair implants.  So natural, so long, so sexy…this did the trick and the proof is in the pudding.  He is now the talk of the town and life couldn’t be better.  Go get ‘em Scoot!

Just a few of the great things that can be done, right out of the fly shop. When you are ready to move up in the world, come see us.

 

SHOUT2

The Best Fishing Tattoo Ever?

Imagine the surprise of receiving this picture via text without any prior knowledge that the person was going to be getting this tattoo.  Then imagine that person being your 50 year old father!  I laughed so hard I cried.  My face hurt from the explosion of laughter that followed seeing this picture.

Granted my dad does have other tattoos ranging from band insignias to our family crest, but this was completely out of left field.  Even for my dad!

He calls it the “Shout”.  It’s a Shark Trout.

After his trip to Florida and his experience beach fishing for shark there, he decided he needed to do something to remember this great trip and his love for fishing.  So he created the Shout.

Now, when we go out into the lakes, rivers and streams to fish, we joke about finding another hybrid fish idea for him.  I think he’s got room for a few more.

Tattoo Artist:  James Zehna @ Sailor Jims Electric Tattoo in Logan, UT

 

I Totally Want To Throw Her For Muskie

The fly-tying-materials-in-your-hair-craze came front and center here today.  These very nice girls came by looking for hackles, flashabou and fur to integrate into their hair.  Much like a Tiger Muskie, they seemed to be attracted to the brighter, flashier colors.

We called all of our fly tying supplies and got promptly laughed at when we told them we were looking for long saddle hackles.

We advised the ladies to be careful if they went near any saltwater flats or the lakes with long fish.

When we said we wanted more women to get into fly fishing…this is not necessarily what we meant.

Let us know what you think…