Tag Archives: fly tying

Fitzroy-Trout

Simple Fly Fishing 101: Tenkara Rod Setup

As some of you may notice if you frequent our website, Fishwest is now excited to bring you Tenkara rods. Better yet, we are bringing you the Simple Fly Fishing Tenkara Rod & Kit from our great friends from Patagonia.

In a very simple nutshell, Tenkara is the traditional Japanese method of fly fishing, it is ideal for mountain streams. Tenkara fishing an angler only uses a rod line and fly. That means no reel is required. 

Even though these rods are designed for smaller creeks and rivers the possibilities of what these rods can do is really endless.  I for one am quite intrigued about these rods and am excited to see them in the action. Now I just have to learn how to use one. Do any of you out there use these cool rods?

 

Morning On The Holston

A Question: A Reflection On Fly Fishing

Fall Fishing A question was asked of me today of which I thought I knew the answer, but upon further introspection, I suspect that perhaps I need to reset my footing.  A friend asked me today why exactly it was that I fly fish and why it was that I do not keep the very thing that I spend so much time and effort to get in my net?  I gave him what I suspect would be considered an answer gleaned from the liturgy of the angler, an answer that contained all the right keywords to at least insinuate that I knew what I was doing.  I am writing a book about it for goodness sake, so my answer came forth without any forethought.  Not because of any rehearsal, but because I have conversed enough, I have read enough, and perhaps on some levels I have written enough so that I have all the right words.  But a wise man once said to me, “If your words and your actions do not match, no one will believe a word you say”.

I used all the key phrases that would get the approving nod from my contemporaries.  Words like, challenge, nature, peace, wild places, clean water, skill, beauty, conservation.  All of these, or at least some of these will appear in literally every published volume on the sport, which would justify, in effect, that what I was saying was correct.  But just because you say the right things, you are not granted membership into those who “get it”.  Many are the folk who have all the accouterments of the sport-the right gear, the right look, the proper technique yet they seem somewhat empty.  I suppose it is the empty ones who do not last very long in the sport.  As a matter of fact, I have a couple of friends who dove into the deep end, bought all the gear, but when there was nothing left to buy, they found that it wasn’t the sport they were interested in at all.

So what makes me a true angler?  If I were to remove the nice gear and replace it with the worst possible equipment-would I still hold the passion?  If I were to be dropped into a situation where the only place I had to cast a fly were to bluegill in an algae laden farm pond-would I still hold the passion?  If I had never stepped out as a writer of fly fishing- would I still hold the passion.  If all the key words and catch phrases were removed from my rather limited vocabulary- would I still hold the passion?

In all honesty, after much introspection, the answer would be yes.  You see, as far as a great…or even good fly fisherman…I am at a loss.  More times than not my cast is not pretty and if I am in the water for more than three hours it is a certainty that I will manage to create a mess of my leader that would be in league with the Rubik’s Cube in difficulty to repair.  I am often quite clumsy as I wade, and the biggest fear I have in life is drowning.  My flies are not pristine, and my selection looks more mutant than even an attractor pattern might imply.  As a fly fisherman, I am just about as undone as you will find.

Therefore, without an abundance of skill and a limited perspective, I am faced with a burning question imposed upon me innocently enough by a curious companion.  Why exactly do I fly fish?  And to answer in as simple a way as I know how, the answer comes to me without having to dig very deep at all.

I cannot even try to imagine myself NOT being one.

This sport is as much a part of me as my next breath, much as a runner with his or her next stride.  The great race horse Secretariat was said to have a heart larger than is common for a horse.  Larger heart meant an incredible blood flow and an expanded capacity to do that which it was born to do.  I can see myself in no less of a term.

Great WaterIf you fish with me, it is a near certainty that you will outfish me.  I know this to be so because of the number of times it has actually occurred.  For me the epic day is nothing more than blind luck.  I can read the water well thanks in great part to Tom Rosenbauer.  I can understand the methodology of fly selection, casting, and most other things that encompass a day in the water.  But all the information in the world will not make you a great angler.  There comes a time when skill must take over…and in that department I am most lacking.

Yet I continue to frail about, stumble, make messes, and admire those of whom I spend time on the water.  I get so frustrated at times with myself that I curse under my breath at the bad luck or bad technique, yet the very next opportunity I have to fish, I will be there playing the role of jester in my own court again.  Not because I am a glutton for punishment and self degradation.  It is because I am a fly fisherman, and I cannot help but do that which I have found to be a very large part of me.  Tangles and all.Morning On The Holston

Greg Pearson

GreenDrakeOutdoors: Flats Of The High Desert

 

Local fly fishing industry professional and great friend of Fishwest Greg Pearson was kind enough to send us this awesome little video which has us all excited for spring and summer carp fishing. Here are Greg’s thoughts on the video itself. Simply put:  While carp are an invasive species and not for everyone, they are wary, large game fish that offer a challenge away from the crowded trout streams…..Enjoy!

Fishpond Road Trip Fly Tying Kit Bag

Holiday Gift Ideas: Fishpond Road Trip Fly Tying Kit Bag

I know most guys complain about their in-laws, but I have to say, my in-laws give some of the greatest gifts. A Christmas or two ago, I ripped off the wrapping paper to find the Fishpond Road Trip Fly Tying Kit. Fishpond definitely hit one out of the park with this bag and it goes with me on any out of town fishing trip so that I can tie a few extra flies after a long day on the water..

What I like -

Organization – there are more pockets and compartments in the Fishpond Road Trip Kit than you can shake a stick at.

  • Padded internal storage pocket for your vice and tying tools.
  • 2 small storage pockets
  • Four large “see through” zippered mesh material pockets
  • Two 9” clear tubes for thread spools
  • One 4.5”x9”x1” molded plastic organizing box for hooks, beads, etc.
  • Nine 4”x6” resealable, clear, poly bags with Velcro binding attachment
  • Nine 3”x4.5” resealable, clear, poly bags with Velcro binding attachment

Before any big trip, I sort through the different pockets and make sure I have the right materials for area that I’ll be fishing. Most of the bags, boxes, tubes are velcro attached and can therefore be rearranged to fit whatever your needs are for a particular trip. It never ceases to amaze me how much I can actually fit into this case.

Fishpond Road Trip Fly Tying Kit Bag10Construction – The case is built out of the Fishpond Diamondtech fabric, which makes it extremely durable. Being constructed of fabric and with dimensions of 12” x 9.5″ x 4”, The Road Trip Kit is just the right size to squeeze into a suitcase or gear bag.

The Fishpond Guarantee – “At Fishpond, our goal is to build a reputation for unmatched quality among the outdoor enthusiasts using our products. Our soft goods are covered by a lifetime guarantee.”

What I don’t like

The thread spool tubes - Nice idea that doesn’t really stand up. The tubes hold multiple spools of thread, but have a tendency to pop open and have them fall out everywhere. I ended up using a piece of tape to keep it securely shut.

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Bottom line – The Fishpond Road Trip Fly Tying Kit is an essential piece of gear to keep you organized and churning out flies when you’re on the road. A must have for the traveling fly fisherman.

Check out the Fly Tying Kit by clicking HERE

Flies

Holiday Gift Guide 101: Choosing The Right Gift For A Fly Fisherman

Flies As the holidays approach here at Fishwest we tend to see a lot of folks coming in to shop for the pesky fly fisherman in the family. This situation can go one of two ways. On one hand we see people come in who have done the research and know exactly what they need: quick, easy, and painless. However, more often than not we see folks come in that are completely lost in terms of finding a gift for that special fisherman in their lives.  This is where we come in and save the day.  Follow these guidelines below and the results will be a holiday “home run” of sorts.

I would say that gift from a fly shop fit into three categories. Those three categories would be big ticket items, offseason utems, and the bare essentials. The bare essentials are easy to come by and these are items that a majority of anglers use. I am talking about things spools of tippet, leaders, and flies.  All these things are pretty small and would fit perfectly into a stocking or a small box. The nicest part about the essentials is that they are relatively inexpensive, which means a small budget can go a long way. Even though there is nothing exciting about these gifts I will guarantee you that they will be appreciated greatly.

Confluence FilmsNext on the list would be what I would deem offseason items. By my definition these are items to pass time while your favorite fishing areas are closed for the season or Mother Nature is keeping you away. A great example of this would be the Confluence Films collection. These videos are great for both showcasing the sport of fly fishing to new anglers while also stoking the fires of long time anglers alike. Another example of this is fly tying materials. Winter is the time when a majority of anglers pass the time by tying flies and replenishing their stock of flies for the upcoming adventures. The nice thing is that these materials are also quite inexpensive so a small budget goes along way. The latest and greatest fly tying materials like Clear Cure Goo or EP Fibers are sure to make an angler happy and pass the time till the next fishing outing with relative ease.

Hatch 4 PlusLastly we get to my favorite category in the Fishwest gift giving guide as deemed by me, the “big ticket” item. The Winston Rods and Hatch Reels those once and the big ticket item is a wonderful gift however they require a lot of research beforehand.  However doing this research is pretty easy.  Knowing where your angler likes to fish can go a long way in determining what type of gift to get them.  Also be sure to ask them how they like to fish their favorite waters.  Even make sure to ask the staff at the fly shop your angler frequents or even his or her fishing buddies. At that point you should have all the info to make an educated choice when it comes to picking the perfect big ticket item. I know I cannot speak for all fly fishermen but I would be ecstatic if there was a fly rod or reel under the tree for me this year.

There you have it! With this information you should be able to put a smile on the face of the fly fisherman in your life. When it comes time to pick out a gift be sure to ask the staff members here at Fishwest. We are more than happy to help. For me as a shop employee it is always extremely rewarding to help pick out a gift that you know someone will enjoy. Also if all else fails gift certificates are always an option that can be used both in shop and online.

Happy Holidays from the Fishwest staff!

Sage One Humidor

A Midday Break: Sage One Humidor Review

There’s nothing much more enjoyable than taking a break midday from fishing and smoking decent cigar. All the craziness of life fades into the background as the river continues it’s run downstream through the haze of cigar smoke.

Although there are several different options of transporting your sticks to and from the river, Sage really hit one out of the park with their Sage One Humidor. Here’s what I like about it

1. Protection – The aluminum tube keeps your cigars safe from danger so you can focus on your fly presentation. Also for those that wade a bit deeper, fear not. The screw on lid of the case is lined with a water tight gasket to keep the water out should you take an unsuspecting dip.

2. Plenty of room – The Sage One Humidor has a 2” diameter. Depending on your choice of cigar, you can carry multiple cigars on the water so you can share with a buddy or smoke like a chimney all day long.

3. Humidor – There’s nothing worse than the anticipation of a good cigar only to find a crispy, dry stick instead. The inside of the Sage humidor is lined with cedar and on the lid is a small little humidifier that you can add some distilled water too, so you’re cigars will be kept in that optimum environment.

Bottom line: The Sage One Humidor is an excellent option for the fly fisherman who enjoys a nice cigar on the water.

For more info on the Sage One Humidor please click Here.

 

Chasing Silver - Andy's Return

Chasing Silver – Andy’s Return: Film Review

Chasing Silver: Andy's ReturnIf you have read my previous two reviews, you have read the disclaimers, so I don’t feel the need to keep rewriting it, so reference those to see what does not credential me write film reviews.

I have wanted to fish for tarpon since the first year I started fly fishing seriously but have not found the funds to go on a tarpon trip, but it is on the bucket list.  To me tarpon on the fly would be akin to hunting bears with a switch, the prey has the advantage as verified by Chasing Silver’s Andy Mill, with the statement “22 hook-ups and zero landed last season”.  What would give an angler the desire to keep returning to fish for tarpon after a season like that?  To me it is easy; it is in their blood, once the craving is instilled, it cannot be sated.  I can relate to Andy’s philosophy, if you pull out a stogie, you will catch fish, fisherman and their superstitions, if it is stupid and it works, it isn’t stupid.

The sights that are seen in this movie want me to pack up my truck, sell my hunting stuff and drive to the Keys and buy a flats boat.  I have caught some good fish on a fly rod but these tarpon look like they are the ultimate fish, strong, acrobatic jumps, explosive runs, and they weigh as much as most anglers.  The gill plate clattering jumps, drag melting runs shown in Chasing Silver can instill the impulse to upgrade to a 12 weight outfit.

Although the action in Chasing Silver is off and on, look for the educational aspect on the flies, tides, and light on the water, this could pay dividends prior to a trip to tarpon waters.  Watch the special features selection for some good advice.   I know what flies I will be tying for the next Fishwest sponsored South Andros trip, just in case (last year a 50 pound tarpon was caught the week following our departure).  The photography on this film is enjoyable giving a contrast to the bleak weather outside.

My advice, get Chasing Silver from Fishwest this winter and travel to the Keys, catch some rays and have a good cigar.

I give Chasing Silver four dry flies.

A night with Clear Cure Goo

Product Review: Clear Cure Goo

A night with Clear Cure GooI have used many different types of epoxies throughout my fly fishing and fly tying careers. And I agree that at the end of the day, they all do pretty much the same thing. However, after coming to Fishwest, I was introduced to Clear Cure Goo epoxies. They are relatively new in the world of fly tying epoxies, but have quickly gained popularity amongst tiers in both freshwater and saltwater realms. Their product line offers tiers a wide variety of epoxies, covering all tying situations from small nymphs for trout, to large saltwater baitfish patterns.

For the Mountain West, I have found that the Clear Cure Goo Hydro and Thin epoxies cover most of my trout fly tying needs. The Hydro is perfect for putting a hard translucent layer on chironomids bodies, and topcoats for shells on nymphs. The Thin epoxy has just enough viscosity for situations that require larger amounts such as when building heads for streamers and baitfish patterns. The Thin epoxy does cure with a slight tacky feel, so a final thin coat of Hydro is necessary for a tack-free finish. I would also recommend that if you consider yourself a slower tier, or really want to build larger heads, to purchase their Thick epoxy

No matter which Clear Cure Goo products you use, the final results are a finish as hard, clear, and smooth as glass that I have yet to find crack, chip, or yellow.

Geofish

Get Your Popcorn Ready: Geofish Volume 1 Mexico Review

Authors Note: I am going to do my best impression of the late Roger Ebert here but by no means am I a film critic. After many years anticipating this movie release, here are my thoughts:

This is the type of adventure that I could find myself contemplating doing with my buddies. Going beyond the contemplation stage is probably out of the question for me at this point. The movie follows four friends, Jay Johnson, Chris Owens, Thad Robinson and Brian Jill (Formerly of AEG Media) as they attempt an 8,000 mile journey from the friendly confines of the Pacific Northwest to the tip of South America. Leg one sees the crew venture off into mainland Mexico.

The trip itself starts off as an adventure with the acquisition of a 1996 Ford F250 off of good ole reliable Craigslist.  They picked up this truck from a Utah dairy farmer who delivered it to them on a trailer. Red flag? Not for these guys, just a minor speed bump.  Running off of a limited budget these guys needed a more economical way of traveling. Knowing that gas prices would be the biggest determent the film budget these guys decided to convert their glorious F250 into a veggie oil powered home away from home. With the extreme generosity of Joel Woolf of Veg Powered systems who helped to do a complete overhaul of their F250 they were finally able to start their adventure.

Overcoming obstacles is a reoccurring theme throughout the movie. From spewing vegetable oil on the streets of Mexico to getting robbed at knifepoint at a Wal-Mart, these guys become good “amigos” with the Policia during their travels. The best part is that even after all these events they still soldier on, and with good reason.

The fishing sequences within this movie can be accurately described in one word. EPIC! First off is Marlin fishing 101. This isn’t your fancy marlin fishing that you see with a giant deep sea yacht and a full crew teasing in fish. The reality is that these guys are motoring around off the coast in a tiny panga with an outboard motor with a “guide” that doesn’t speak a lick of English searching for these leviathan creatures. The fishing starts off slow, but when they finally figure out how to do it the fishing pays off. That day Marlin fishing has to be one of those days that those guys will never ever forget.

It doesn’t end there. From lakes in central Mexico that are the homes goliath Bass to the baby Tarpon and Snook of the Yucatan. These fishing outings are the foundation of stories that become fishing legend and lore. Without giving too much away some of these locations and fish give a new fresh perspective to being “Off the Grid”.

Overall the greatest single thing about this adventure has to be that these guys got to do it together. Friendship and camaraderie is an important aspect of the sport of Fly Fishing. This movie is the ultimate example of that. Four buddies traveling thousands of miles while enjoying a sport that they love along the way. Does it get any better than that? I don’t think so. So get your popcorn ready! If you are interested in this Geofish or other fly fishing films and media please check out the Books & Media  section at Fishwest enjoy!