Tag Archives: trout

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Catch & Release

L1150291Every 4 or 5 years the tropical moisture of El Nino creates monsoons in the Rocky Mountains from late July through August and possibly September during enhanced cycles. This is a good thing. Typically August is the hottest month in the northern hemisphere and daily rain cools the air temperate, increases river flows and consequently also lowers water temperate. Cold water fish species endure less stress. The downside is the rivers tend to be more turbid from muddy runoff upstream. In times of plenty, anglers should continue using good techniques for catch and release. Fish mortality increases with stress and injury.

P1090376Stress factors that will kill fish are lack of oxygen in warm water, fighting a fish to exhaustion, poor landing and keeping them too long out of water. In addition, bringing fish, such as, grayling or lake trout from deep water too quickly to the surface can be fatal. Anglers need a balance of experience and good sense. Don’t fish in low water on hot days. A fish shouldn’t be out of the water longer than anglers can hold their breath. Higher test-strength line shortens the battle. Keeping the fish in the net and in the water helps insure a long life. Wet your hands before handling fish. A dry hand can wipe the mucus or slime from the skin and increase the possibility of infection.

P1060925Injury is reduced with artificial flies and lures. A fish will suck bait in deeply. By chance if your fly is hooked deep, simply cut the line close to the hook. It will typically deteriorate. Don’t worry about losing fish with barbless hooks, just keep the line tight. They are easier to remove from the lips, mouths and cheeks. Avoid handling your catch over hard surfaces such as boats and rocks. Fish wiggle a lot and are slippery. So, keep them in the net and if possible release them from the net. Neoprene nets are better than twine and bigger baskets hold the all of the fish. With wet hands, gently place your catch in slower water, facing upstream in a river, pushing them forward and pulling back until they swim from your hands. Practice good conservation in your piscaphilia purses. All anglers want to photograph their trophy, so just hold your breath and smile.

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I Turned My Wife On……to Fly Fishing

I previously lived 15 minutes away from a trout paradise known as the Platte river in Wyoming.  Then I found myself married and moving back to Iowa where my wife and I both grew up.  It only made sense since both of our families are here.  Obviously the trout fishing is not as lucrative, but the hawkeye state has some great areas to fish.

DSC02035My wife knew nothing of fly fishing until we got married.  After a few outings with our fishing crew and a couple of backpacking trips out west, we finally convinced her to give it a shot.  It didn’t take long and she was asking tons of questions.  She was hooked like a driftless brown taking a juicy hopper in September.

We started her off with the basics, putting a rod and reel together, stringing a rod, the difference between fly line, leader and tippet.  She found it interesting how much their is to know before a fly even hits the water. DSC_0610

We even spent time on the tailgate at home practicing knots with string just to make it easier to learn.  Through the spring and summer she has fished in Wyoming, Colorado and Iowa.  She is now proficient at reading water and has an understanding where the fish tend to hang out. She is quickly learning and  the different ways to cast and mend her line to get that fly where she wants it.  After our last trip to northeast Iowa, her favorite two fly combo is now the hopper dropper.  It is fun to watch her progress in her knowledge and skills.  I find it as exciting as she does when she hooks up, and share in her frustration and laughter when she misses. DSC_0616

After a great day on the stream we find ourselves back on the tailgate talking about the day and enjoying our favorite craft beer.  She always has one last question, “when do we get to go again?”

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Fishwest 5wt “Showdown” – Part 4: The Helios 2


FWF05FWDCFW_lgToday marks the long awaited return of the Fishwest 5wt Shootout. Morgan and I have been so busy fishing and in the shop lately that we haven’t had a chance to get together and really put the remaining rods to the test. For that we do apologize so without further adieu here are our thoughts on the next rod in the shootout: The Helios 2: Tip Flex by The Orvis Company.

The Orvis Company has a long and storied history in the sport of fly fishing. Charles F. Orvis of Manchester Vermont started the Orvis Company in 1856. Orvis holds the distinction of being the oldest fly tackle manufacturer in America, since its inception Orvis has been producing exceptional fly tackle and is constantly pushing the boundaries of technological innovation within their fly rods.

orvis_logoThe Helios 2 is the flagship of the Orvis line with good reason.  Building off of the 2007 release of the original Helios, the H2 is 20% lighter and stronger than its predecessor the Helios.  If the performance of the rod doesn’t speak for itself the ascetics of the rod most certainly will. The deep blue blank and the Machined aluminum reel seat with beautiful wood insert take this rod over the top.

As always in order to maintain fairness within the test we utilized the same reel and line combination with each rod. For this test we have decided to use the Clearwater Fly Reel from Orvis and that is paired with the Gold Taper fly line from Rio.

Without boring you to death with more details here are the thoughts Morgan and I had about the H2.

IMG_760330ft: Paired with the Rio Gold Line I feel like this rod did okay loading up within this distance. With that being said you could totally tell this rod has plenty more to offer in terms of power so it took a minute to get used to casting this rod within this distance.  The presentation qualities of this rod would suffer in my opinion due to the tip being a little on the stiffer side when paired with this line.  I honestly believe that if an angler overlined this rod it would definitely perform much better in what I would consider “typical” trout range.

50ft: This is where the rod really started to shine. This is where the rod became more accurate and a lot easier to cast. Flies landed like a whisper. The extremely lightweight nature of the rod itself made it both easy and highly enjoyable to cast at this distance with knowing that the rod still had plenty in the tank in order to throw out the “hero” cast.

IMG_760570ft: Again long distance casts were smooth as silk and as easy as 1st grade level math homework.  Again the rod handled the casts with grace and precision. These casts rarely if ever get made when fishing for trout. However with the H2 in hand I would have the utmost confidence in getting the job done right in the first cast.

Morgan:

I was very excited to get my hands on the Orvis Helios 2 after watching some very impressive videos of the rod intentionally being broken.  Being the oldest U.S. fly fishing company, Orvis rods have a lot to live up to and the 9’ 5 weight Tip Flex H2 did not disappoint.  In my opinion, this rod was one of the best do it all, Rocky Mountain trout rods in our shootout. Orvis offers the H2 in either a Tip Flex model or a Mid Flex model. With many rods currently on the market being faster action tip flex rods, we chose to stick with the most similar offering for the H2. Aesthetically, the H2 is beautiful. A dark blue blank strays from the ambers, greens, and blacks that we see from many other manufacturers.

IMG_760430ft: The Helios 2 did pretty well casting within 30ft which is what I would consider “Utah range” for our local readers. The rod had a little more backbone than I prefer for short casting but adjusting your casting stroke will get you into the sweet spot. The tip is little stiff for close quarters presentations but an over weighted line like the Scientific Anglers GPX or even the full weight heavy Rio Grand would get the rod loading more at shorter distances.

50ft: With 20 more feet of line, the rod started to load a bit deeper into the blank which made the feel of this rod much more apparent. The smooth taper and light weight of the H2 made it a breeze to cast and a pleasure to hold. The H2 was plenty accurate at 50ft and as we saw, it could do ever greater distances with great accuracy.

IMG_761670ft: Long distance casts were met with ease and accuracy. Most of us rarely cast 70ft casts but when it becomes necessary to make serious casts, it can be done and it can still be done with confidence and accuracy. The performance of this rod with this much line out doesn’t suffer. Some rods will get it done but this rod gets it done well.

Overall Morgan and I agreed 100% on this rod. This would be an excellent “all around” trout rod. However with that being said we also came to the conclusion that this rod may be best suited overlined with a 6wt line or a line with over weighted construction like the Scientific Anglers GPX ,Rio Grand, or the Orvis Hydros Power Taper.

There you have it as always we hope that you enjoyed our thoughts on the Helios 2 and this latest addition to the Fishwest 5wt shootout. For questions about the H2 or any of the rods in the shootout please give us a call at 801.617.1225 or drop us a line at support@fishwest.com. Stay tuned for the next installment. The “One” rod by Sage.

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Destination Fishing: New Zealand’s North Island

With fall approaching and the summer season ending our minds here at Fishwest have been wandering towards fishing destinations around the world. As the season is starting to cool off here it’s about to heat up in the southern hemisphere. The crew at Gin-Clear Media has put together another great video highlighting the great fishing opportunities found in New Zealand.

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Fly Fishing 101: Thoughts On Etiquette

Editors Note: This wonderful Insight comes from Ryan and the guide staff from Driftless On The Fly located in North East Iowa. The Driftless region provides excellent opportunities for anglers of all skill levels to enjoy a variety of coldwater and warmwater fly fishing situations. Without further adieu, please enjoy – JC


There is a great deal to learn when starting out, so while learning the basics of casting, fly selection, and hooking is important to the fishing process, we also try to impart some of social aspects of fishing as well.P1020265

Fishing etiquette may sound silly to some, but to any fly fishermen out there who have had their long-awaited trip interrupted by someone who lacks this sense of courtesy, they know full well the importance of this knowledge. It seems like anyone who has fished long enough generally has a story about this.

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  • Give others space. If you approach another fisherman on the stream, try to respect the fact that they want their solitude.  Often a knowing short greeting or simple nod and smile will suffice. If they want to converse, they will.
  • Do not fish directly up stream or down stream of them. Continue to walk upstream or down and find another place. You can always come back. Fishing directly above or below could spook the fish they are working on, and honestly- they were there first. We recently took our Fly Fishing Club on their trip. While working with a young man on a particularly nice run, another fisherman approached on the opposite side and began to fish our run.  The man apparently had no idea that this was wrong,  and in fact started talking to us while throwing his line over the top of ours. I instructed my student to reel in, and we had a great conversation later about what not to do. A teachable moment on the stream.
  • Pack out all trash. This includes line and strike indicators.  Leave only footprints. In Iowa, we are lucky enough to fish private land  where they permit public fishing.  Don’t do do anything that jeopardizes that.
  • Pay it forward by offering to help someone that looks like they may need it, and I am speaking more in a physical sense- climbing a slippery bank, safely crossing a fence, making a stream crossing. Fly fisherman are generally a generous community and will come to the aid of others, but don’t assume that someone wants your help, especially when it comes to technique.

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It really comes down to common sense and the golden rule while out on the stream. Respect one another and the land that you are privileged to fish and everyone wins.

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SharkWave: The Next Generation of Textured Lines

Last weekend I had the opportunity to try out Scientific Angler’s SharkWave Ultimate Trout fly line while fishing with a buddy. He had just purchased the line a few weeks back and had been obsessing about the line since he bought it, half way through the day I asked him if I could throw his setup and test it out for myself. I noticed a difference between the two lines on the first cast. Compared to the Rio line I have on my setup, the SharkWave felt like it just flew out of the guides, allowing me to make longer cast with less effort. Not only did I notice the difference in casting ability but also I could get longer drifts due to the line riding higher on the water. Both of these qualities should be familiar to those who have fished textured lines in the past. 

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The new SharkWave fly line incorporates the same technology as the other Scientific Anglers textured lines, a micro-textured surface to trap air for a higher ride and reduce friction through the rod guides and on the water surface. With the SharkWave line they have made improvements on an already great line designs, they have fused three different texture technologies from previous lines before into one.

The front taper is designed with the SkarkSkin texture that was introduced in 2007, as well as SA’s Dry-Tip technology. The micro-balloons in the Dry-Tip technology allows the tip to ride super high putting less drag on your leader and allowing it to float on the surface longer. The belly and running line incorporate the Mastery Textured divots for the same reason, less drag on the line, and they have added 30 inches of the TRP (Tactile Reference Point) texture to allow the caster to feel and hear the transition from the head to the running line.

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One thing I haven’t gotten use to yet and not sure if I like is the noise of the line. It is noisy and can get kind of annoying hearing your line on every cast you make. Usually when we fish all we want to hear are the sounds of nature, this is what a lot of anglers expect when we go out on the water. So does the performance override the small annoyance of the noise the line makes while moving through the guides? I believe so, eventually the angler would get use to hearing it and tune it out; you really can’t beat the performance of these lines. The SharkWave is offered in three different styles, Ultimate Trout, GPX, and Saltwater making it easy to find a line for almost any fishing situation you will encounter.

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Glass Is Not Dead: Echo Glass Fly Rod

I finally had a chance to break-in my Echo Glass this past weekend, and found that glass is just an awesome way to catch trout. I purchased a 6’ 9” 3 weight a few weeks ago, I had taken it up to one of our local rivers as soon as I bought it to test it out and had terrible luck. I Wasn’t use to the super slow action of the rod, I kept making terrible casts and couldn’t get the hook set right, it has a completely different feel from all of my graphite rods I own, once I got home I started to second guess my purchase. I couldn’t understand what all the hype was about. I had read so many blog post and comments on fishing with glass and many of them raved about how much fun glass was.

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After that first outing I put the glass on ice for a couple weeks, it wasn’t until this past weekend I decided to fish it on a smaller creek that I had great success on the week before. Knowing that the creek had been fishing extremely well I figured this would be a good opportunity to hook into some fish. This time I was more familiar with the action of the rod, making better casts and could land flies accurately where before I was lucky not to get a tangle.

Throwing a size 10 Chernobyl Ant, I landed the fly underneath an overhanging bush; sure enough I had my first take, the first impression of the rod with a fish on was, “this is awesome, you can feel every move the fish made, every twist and turn and every head shake.” It was a larger fish and was a little concerned the rod wouldn’t have enough of a backbone to keep it out of the submerged branches or handle the force of the fight combined with the water flow. I ended up coaxing the fish around the branches and worked it into a pool where I could land it. As the day went on and hooking into more fish my attitude towards the Echo Glass change dramatically, it was such a sweet feel; it made every fight super fun, even for smallest fish and the larger ones, watch out because you were about to go for a ride.

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Once the day was over I came to the conclusion that this is not a beginner’s rod, you definitely want to be an experienced caster. This thing is a noodle, so you have to slow your cast down a lot, that being said once you have your cast dialed in you can’t ask for a more sensitive and fun rod. If you are looking for a rod to fish those smaller and more technical creeks this is it, short enough to make those tough cast under branches easier but still has enough power to make longer casts.

Pros

  • Sensitive and fun
  • Ability to land cast into difficult locations
  • Great for dry flies and emergers

Cons

  • The learning curve from graphite
  • Difficulties casting when the wind picks up
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Simple Fly Fishing 101: Tenkara Rod Setup

As some of you may notice if you frequent our website, Fishwest is now excited to bring you Tenkara rods. Better yet, we are bringing you the Simple Fly Fishing Tenkara Rod & Kit from our great friends from Patagonia.

In a very simple nutshell, Tenkara is the traditional Japanese method of fly fishing, it is ideal for mountain streams. Tenkara fishing an angler only uses a rod line and fly. That means no reel is required. 

Even though these rods are designed for smaller creeks and rivers the possibilities of what these rods can do is really endless.  I for one am quite intrigued about these rods and am excited to see them in the action. Now I just have to learn how to use one. Do any of you out there use these cool rods?

 

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Product Review: The Ross Essence FC

 Over the years I have owned and casted a number of great rods, but the 8’ 6” Ross Essence FC has always been my go-to 5 weight. The rod works well in a variety of different fishing situations and styles, from tossing small dries to chucking medium sized streamers, fishing large waters to small creeks, and used in pursuit of everything from blue gills to largemouth bass.Ross Essence shot

The FC is an exceptional beginner’s rod; priced under $200 so you won’t have to take out a loan in order to purchase it, the medium-fast action is very forgiving on those less than perfect casts and throws the line out when you do get a perfect cast with the ability to get a forty foot cast.

It loads nicely for short quick casts and very accurate for close tight presentations under bushes and around tree lines. Also it lays the fly down softly without spooking wary fish that may be around. It’s super sensitive and has a great feel when you get hook into a fish. When friends ask me why I don’t use a higher end rod, I just reply “This rod has everything I want! Sensitivity, accuracy, and power, I just love the feel of it!”Ross Essence shot1

If I was to do it all over again I would probably go with the 9 foot model, at times when the wind picks up long cast can be difficult but manageable, I believe the 9 footer would handle the wind a lot better but may make fishing small creeks more frustrating. My recommendation would be to think about what situations you would be fishing in the most and that will help narrow your focus.

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Product Spotlight: Fishpond Nomad Mid Length Net

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Why: To be honest, I really like to look and feel of a wooden net. Knowing that someone took the time to handcraft a piece of wood into a work of art is pretty special. But there are times, when a net is going to get beat up and you need a true workhorse to get the job done. Enter the Fishpond Nomad Mid-Length Net.

First impressions:

The material –  The Fishpond Nomad Mid-length net is made from a carbon fiber and fiberglass composite material. They are waterproof, UV resistant, lightweight, and float like a cork.

The specs – The Mid-length net runs 37” long with a 13”x18” head. The total weight of the net scales out to .88 pounds.

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The history – I first heard of Nomad nets a couple years ago when Kevin Best first started the Nomad Net company. It was pretty obvious that Nomad nets were solid, and it didn’t take long for Fishpond to see a good thing and bring Nomad nets into the Fishpond fold. Fishpond has since expanded the line up with different lengths and different colors of nets.

Field Use:

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One of the places that the Fishpond Nomad Net really proved itself was at Pyramid Lake. The saline water of Pyramid Lake does a number on gear, especially wooden nets. Having the Fishpond Nomad net is really nice as the salt in the water does nothing to the composite waterproof frame of the net.  The net floats like a cork so no need there was no need to worry about it when trying to wrangle a thrashing Pyramid Lake Lahontan cutthroat.

The Mid-Length Nomad net really is the missing link between a short handled creek net and an unweildable guide net. At 37” overall length, it gives you just enough reach to get the net under a big fish without being too long that you would have to use two hands.

Fishpond3The head of the net measures 13” by 18” and is plenty big enough for any freshwater fish that I run into. The clear rubber net bag comes standard on all Nomad nets, although you can buy a black bag to switch out if you want. While the rubber bags are all the rage because they keep the fish safer than the old nylon bags, I think the bigger selling point is that you’ll never get your hook stuck in one of those nylon strands again.

Due to the composite material that the net is made from, the Fishpond Nomad Mid-length is extremely lightweight. When you consider the lightweight nature of the net and the extra length of the handle, the Mid-length net is a great choice for guys who like to tuck a net in between their lumbar packs and their body. It certainly works well if you’re fishing a big river and not moving too far, although I found that after a several mile hike, the Mid-length net sort of lost it’s appeal as it can get caught on underbrush or overhanging branches.  The extra length makes the Mid-length net ideal from a float tube or pontoon boat.

 Pros:

  • Lightweight strong material
  • Rubber net
  • Floats
  • Waterproof

Cons:

Cost

I was bummed that the Mid-length net did not come with the measuring dots like the Guide and the Boat net

Prognosis:  If you are looking for a great all-around net that can stand up to some serious abuse, definitely check out the Fishpond Nomad Net Line. Shop the Fishpond Nomad Line by clicking the links below: